Often, the hardest part when writing an essay is to have a topic. You will not want one that is too complex or ordinary. If you write about something that does not interest you, you will get bored. But you will not want to write about something you know too much about, because it will not be a challenge. An informative essay tells the reader about the subject, giving you information and information and helping you to understand it better. It can also be called an expository essay, as it clarifies and explains the subject.

Interest or hobby
Choose something that interests you or a hobby that you know. Find out how to keep track of your genealogy, the best type of fishing rod and how to use it, or why your favorite football player is so successful in the sport. Because you have a personal experience or knowledge of the subject, you can write an essay on a hobby or interest without researching, or doing so very little. Probably write an essay that will retain the attention of your reader, since you will communicate your passion for the subject.

Problem or question
Find a problem or question that has at least two reasonable answers, and discuss which one is best. Write about the best way to keep weeds out of the garden, or the best way to study for an exam. These types of topics are often easy to write because there is a natural organization in the format: you make a sketch of the problem or question and then talk about possible solutions or answers. You can compare two or more possible answers or just give the best one.

Cause and effect
Talk about what causes something. It may be something you can not be sure of, but you can speculate, analyze, and quote research that supports one idea or another, such as the causes of sudden child death syndrome, the hole in the ozone layer, or global warming. Choose a topic that has good support for two possible causes or have several interesting studies that give good evidence. Talk about your historical data, such as the rise in autism incidence or the reduction of incidents of SIDS after the “Back to sleep” program was introduced.

Myth or mystery
Break down a popular myth or try to solve a mystery, such as what causes autism or why sharks never sleep. It explains the myth and why it seems to be true, then shows evidence that shows otherwise or explains why the mystery exists, for example how anecdotal evidence can lead observers to conclude that immunizations cause some cases of autism, but later Shows the research showing that the link seems to be a coincidence. For a mystery, you may want to provide more than a probable scenario and leave the conclusion to the reader.

Something new
Explain a relatively new phenomenon or activity, such as rap music or extreme skating. Write about how it became popular and explains the various elements involved. It assumes that the reader knows nothing of it, since it is a new phenomenon of which it can not have heard. The Internet can be your best source of information on topics that are relatively new.